Category: Home Column Post

AMERICAN Supplies 22 miles of Steel Pipe for Harbor Crossing Pipeline in Virginia

One of the more significant moments in AMERICAN’s 105-year history came in 1906 when the company’s first order was shipped to Atlanta Gas Light, a natural gas distribution company then serving Georgia. That started a lasting relationship that was still in place when AMERICAN Steel Pipe recently was chosen as the supplier for Hampton Roads Crossing, an extraordinary natural gas pipeline project in Virginia.

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Aging Water Infrastructure Highlights Need for Investment

In Daly City, Calif., an 8-inch cast iron pipe installed in the 1930s breaks, sending 45,000 gallons of water downhill and damaging houses and vehicles. In a suburb of Washington, D.C., a 54-inch concrete cylinder pipe fails, threatening to leave an estimated 200,000 residents without water for days. In Cherokee County, Ga., a 20-foot section of PVC pipe splits, creating a sink hole.

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Study Shows Trenchless Technology Suitable for Longer Pipe Installations

With the advent of new construction technologies comes the need for proven field tests to advance their use. Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) using ductile iron pipe, first introduced in 1994, is a method of installing the pipe underground without digging a trench. With HDD, a gentle arcing bore path is drilled horizontally beneath the surface, then the pipe is joined section by section above ground, and then pulled through.

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More Than a Century-Old Pipeline Demonstrates Sustainability of Iron Pipe

Roads and bridges, airports, energy systems – all are types of infrastructure that we depend on daily to bring functionality to our lives. Yet one of these infrastructures, concrete roadway, lasts, on average, just half our lifetime before becoming worn, riddled with potholes and in need of resurfacing. Hidden beneath our feet, however, is a durable product that plays a more vital role than all of these combined: Gray cast iron and ductile iron pipe make up roughly two-thirds of the nation’s water infrastructure, and they often last hundreds of years.

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